HISTORIES OF AMERICAN POETRY THE HARLEM
RENAISSANCE AND HIP HOP AS NEW FORMALISM

NHỮNG CUỐN LỊCH SỬ THƠ MỸ, PHỤC HƯNG HARLEM
NHƯ TÂN HÌNH THỨC

_______________________________________________

William B Noseworth

 

 
 

 

 

 

There are, notably, only four major published “Histories of American Poetry” written as such. Kreyborg (1934) proposed to write the first widely published History of American Poetry, using a subtitle from Robert Frost’s “Our Singing Strength,” that focuses, predominantly on poetry that was written in the northeastern United States. Gregory & Zaturneska (1969) wrote their own focused History of American Poetry, but the text only covered 1900-1940, again focusing predominantly on poems written in the northeastern United States with a separate section devoted to the Harlem Renaissance poets “The Negro Poet in America,” (pp. 387-398) which places special emphasis on the celebrated work of Paul Lawrence Dunbar of Ohio, widely billed as the “First popular African American poet writing in English.” Dunbar’s verses were filled with slant rhyme, internal rhyme and formal metered structures. He was an early contemporary of the early Harlem Renaissance poets James Weldon Johnson and William Stanley Brainwaithe (Gregory & Zatruneska 1969: 392). Another figure who features in Kreyborg’s highlight was Claude McKay of Jamaica, followed by Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Sterling A. Brown and Margaret Walker. All the leaders of the Harlem Renaissance were recognized in the volume, although the “Harlem Renaissance” as such was not.

Although Islam has deep roots among African American authorship, Stauffer (1974) may represent the first History of American Poetry that treats the works of an African-American poet to re-take an Islamic influenced name. His history devotes a small section LeRoi Jones, or Imamu Amiri Baraka. It is also the earliest “History of American Poetry” to make mention of the Harlem Renaissance as such. It took American scholarship 50 years to recognize the significance of this creative movement. Stauffer (1974) still devotes sections to earlier African American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar as a “Poet of the Twilight Years” (194-221) and to Johnson, McKay and Hughes as “New Poets” that emphasized “regionalism and language” (221-256). But then, with contemporaries of Baraka, Stauffer emphasizes “Black Poets” such as Conrad Kent Rivers, Dudley Randal, Raymond Patterson, James Emanuel, Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni, and Keorapetse Kgositsile, most of whom came of age during the early part of the civil rights movement in the twentieth century and were specifically attempting to actively reshape American society by speaking truth to power through verse, although the prevalence of “free verse” by the middle of the twentieth century had de-emphasized form and rhyme.

By the publication of the Columbia History of American Poetry (Parini & Miller 1993) the early works of renowned African American poets had become more widely recognized. Now the poetry of the “Harlem Renaissance” was given its own heading (pp. 477-506), as were the “Black Arts Poets” (pp. 707-728) and “Native American Poetry” (pp. 728-750). According to this volume the idea that the “Harlem Renaissance” was a socio-historical reality was apparently still in question in 1993 and even though Hip Hop and Rap music had already reached mainstream popularity, contemporary spoken word poetry wasn’t included in the volume. There was nearly as much attention devoted to Amiri Baraka as any other of the most influential of American poets. However, the connection between the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and the 1970s and the almost immediately emerging Hip Hop movement that originated in the Bronx, New York City in the 1970s was entirely absent. In other words, the volume ignores the most popular poetic form at the time of its publication.

Through the work of DJ, Activist and Hip Hop artists Afrika Bambatta highlights the early social importance of Hip Hop artists as reformed gang members brought youth into the preforming arts scene in inner city neighborhoods. But his lyrics also highlight an important trend: the return to semi-formal verse structures and the re-emphasis on rhyme. The Afro-centric Nation of Islam and Nation of Gods and Earth (5% Nation) social organizations has already been popular in inner city neighborhoods in the United States, particularly from the 1950s and 1960s onward. Therefore, it was only a matter of time before popular performed poetry began to marry the voice of Islam, Hip Hop and social awareness. Artists, activists and poets such as Ali Shaheed Mohammed, Q-Tip, Ice Cube, Phife Dawg, Busta Rhymes, Talib Kweli and Mos Def (now: Yasiin Bey) represented, in their line of argument a re-awakening of the social awareness that was characteristic of the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts movement in a new poetic genre to speak truth to the people of the world. Whereas the prejudice of Anglo-American Christianity was actively stamped out Islam and Arabic cultures original influence on poetic forms and formalism throughout the twentieth century, by the late 1990s and 2000s, this was no longer the case.

Khế Iêm has reminded us that the Vietnamese language and English were both originally monosyllabic languages, and the pol-ysyllabalism was only introduced into English language works later, upon the influence of Greek and Roman words being introduced and filtered through romance languages. Similarly, the rhyming nature that New Formalists hold so dear, was brought to the world not from the Romance languages that celebrated rhyme, but from Arabic, which first introduced rhyme and meter through the Qur’an. Mos Def has emphasized the nature of the Qur’an as metered and rhymed in an interview with scholar H. Samy Alim and San Francisco rapper Bigga Figga also emphasized the similarities between Hip Hop lyrical structures and the “pedagogical intentions” of the Qur’an, in that the role of meter and rhyme was used to “reach the hearts and minds of human kind” (Samy Alim 2005: 264-268). So, is Hip Hop New Formalism? Is it Free Verse? Is it neither? Would self-identifying New Formalists recognize Hip Hop as the true inheritor of American Poetic traditions?

The questions posed above are admittedly provocative. Writing with a motive to uncover the truth often is. Having a clear idea invites critique. For example, Khế Iêm has emphasized New Formalism as a means to “bridge” the publishing climates of Vietnam and the United States, while Linh Dinh has critiqued Khế Iêm directly for placing a “dangerous” overemphasis on New Formalism. I would argue this is not the case, as long as we understand that there are a significant number of Vietnamese-American authors, Hao Phan, Linh Dinh and many others, who wholeheartedly accepted the “Beat Generation”-like emphasis on “Free Verse.” I would also argue that in many contemporary scholarly discussions of New Formalism as a genre there has been a general ignorance of the socio-historical complexities of American poetic tradition, many of which have been brought to light by Vietnamese-American literary scholars. But, it is not just the case that New Formalism owes the origins of rhyming structures to Arabic poetry. We should also be constantly reminded that as many as a third of African slaves, including a number of recorded sheikh Islamic intellectuals were brought to the United States through the slave trade. The two central aesthetic qualities of call and response work songs and hymnals popular in nineteenth century African-American culture were a means that primed a re-awakening of Islam in the United States as they preserved the emphasis on formalized musical qualities in verse. Even when as most of the African American slaves were forced to submit to Christianity and take on Euro-Christian names by the nineteenth century, these socio-historical conditions were a primer for the twentieth century re-awakening of Islam among African-Americans.

Although the influence of Hip Hop culture on Vietnamese contemporary Vietnamese poetics has been small, it is present. Vietnamese-American Free Verse poet Bao Phi was invited to join in Mos Def’s “Poetry Slam” productions in the 2000s, and we are beginning to see the first Hip Hop videos produced in Vietnamese and in Vietnam. In Wisconsin, the works of the late Vietnamese-American Johnny “Vietnam” Nguyen are being sadly beginning to be forgotten in only a short few years after his death. However, this does not mean that the ability of the next generation of poets, of any tradition will not have the seeds of influence of Vietnamese-American poets, of Arabic poets, and of African American poets already planted within them.

 

Bibliography

– Alim, H Samy (2005). A New Research Agenda: Exploring the Transglobal Hip Hop Umma. Pp. 264-274 in eds. Miriam Cooke & Bruce B Lawrence.  Muslim Networks from Hajj to Hip Hop. Chapel Hill University Press: North Carolina.
– Curtis, Edward E. (2002). Islam in Black America: Identity, Liberation and Difference in African-American Islamic Thought. State University of New York Press: New York.
– Daulatzai, Sohail (2012). Black Star: Crescent Moon: The Muslim International and Black Freedom Beyond America. University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis, MN.
– GhaneaBassiri, Kambiz (2010). A History of Islam in America. Cambridge University Press: New York
Kreymborg, Alfred (1934). A History of American Poetry. Tudor Publishing Company: New York.
– Parini, Jay & Millier, Brett C. (1993) The Columbia History of American Poetry. Columbia University Press: New York.
– Stauffer, Donald Barlow (1974). A Short History of American Poetry. Dutton & Co.: New York.
– Zaturenska, Marya and Gregory, Horace (1969). A History of American Poetry: 1900-1940. Gordian Press: New York.

 

 

Last modified on 04/28/2015 8:00 PM © 2004 2015 www.thotanhinhthuc.org.

 

 

 

 

"Những cuốn Lịch Sử Thơ Mỹ" chỉ có bốn ấn bản chính đáng kể, được viết theo chủ đề trên. Kreyborg (1934) là người đầu tiên viết và cuốn Lịch Sử Thơ Mỹ được ấn hành rộng rãi, "Sức mạnh hát " (Our Singing Strength), dùng tựa đề một bài thơ của Robert Frost, [tuyển tập này] chú trọng chủ yếu đến thơ được viết tại miền Đông Bắc Hoa Kỳ. Gregory & Zaturneska (1969) viết rằng họ chú tâm vào Lịch Sử Thơ Mỹ, nhưng trong văn bản chỉ nhắc đến [những tác phẩm vào] 1900-1940, một lần nữa, cũng lại đề cập tới những bài thơ được viết trong vùng Đông Bắc Hoa Kỳ, với một phần riêng, "Những Nhà Thơ Mỹ Da Đen" (trang 387-398), dành cho thơ Phục Hưng Harlem, đặc biệt nhấn mạnh đến những tác phẩm nổi tiếng của Paul Lawrence Dunbar từ Ohio, một nhà thơ được biết đến rộng rãi như "Nhà Thơ Mỹ Gốc Phi Nổi Tiếng Đầu Tiên Trong Anh Ngữ." Thơ của Dunbar đầy những vần nghiêng (slant rhyme: hơi vần), vần trong dòng thơ (internal rhyme) và cấu trúc thể luật chính thức. Ông là đồng nghiệp sớm nhất của James Weldon Johnson và Qilliam Stanley Brainwaithe, những nhà thơ Harlem Phục sinh đầu tiên (Gregory & Zatruneska 1969: 392).  Một khuôn mặt khác cũng được Kreyborg đề cao, Claude McKay từ Jamaica, và kế đến là Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Sterling A. Brown và Margaret Walker. Tất cả những nhà thơ lãnh đạo Phục Hưng Harlem đều được công nhận trong tập [này], tuy nhiên thời kỳ lịch sử Phục Hưng Harlem lại không được nhắc đến.

Tuy Hồi Giáo đã bắt rễ sâu xa sâu nơi những tác giả Mỹ gốc Phi, Stauffer(1974) có thể coi là đại diện đầu tiên viết cuốn Lịch Sử Thơ Mỹ,  xử lý những tác phẩm của nhà thơ Mỹ gốc Phi [bằng cách] chọn lại một cái tên có ảnh hưởng Hồi Giáo. Cuốn lịch sử của ông đã dành một mục cho LeRoi, hoặc Imamu Amiri Baraka. Đó cũng là cuốn “Lịch Sử Thơ Mỹ”sớm nhất đề cập đến Phục Hưng Harlem với đúng nghĩa của nó. Giới học giả Hoa Kỳ đã phải tốn 50 năm mới nhận ra tầm quan trọng của phong trào sáng tạo này. Stauffer (1974) vẫn dành một mục cho nhà thơ Mỹ gốc Phi đầu tiên, Paul Laurence Dunbar như là "Nhà thơ Thời Thoái Trào"(194-221), một mục cho John, McKay, và Hughes như những "Nhà thơ Mới" nhấn mạnh tới "khuynh hướng địa phương và ngôn ngữ" (221-256). Nhưng sau đó, Stauffer làm nổi bật những nhà thơ đồng thời với Baraka, "Những Nhà Thơ Da Đen", như Conrad Kent Rivers, Dudley Randal, Raymond Patterson, James Emanuel, Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni, và Keorapetse Kgositsile, hầu hết trưởng thành vào những năm đầu phong trào dân quyền, thế kỷ 20, và đặc biệt, họ cố gắng tích cực phục hồi lại xã hội Hoa Kỳ, bằng cách nói lên sự thật một cách mạnh mẽ qua thơ, mặc dù sự thịnh hành của "thơ tự do" vào giữa thế kỷ 20 đã hạ thấp vị thế của thể thơ và vần.

Qua việc ấn hành cuốn Lịch Sử Thơ Mỹ Columbia (Parini & Miller 1993), những tác phẩm đầu tiên của những nhà thơ Mỹ- Phi nổi danh dần dần được công nhận một cách rộng rãi. Bây giờ, thơ "Phục Hưng Harlem” đã có những tiêu đề riêng (pp. 477-506), như " Nhà Thơ Da Đen"  (pp. 707-728) và "Thơ Người Mỹ Bản Địa" (pp. 728-750). Theo tập này thì ý tưởng "Phục Hưng Harlem" là một thực trạng lịch sử xã hội, rõ ràng vẫn còn trong vòng thắc mắc vào thời điểm 1993, và cho dù Hip Hop và nhạc Rap đã phổ biến trong dòng chính, thơ diễn đọc (spoken-word poetry) đương đại đã không được đề cập trong tập này. [Tập sách] dành nhiều sự quan tâm cho Amiri Baraka, cũng như cho bất cứ ai trong những nhà thơ Mỹ ảnh hưởng nhất. Tuy nhiên, sự liên đới giữa xu hướng Nghệ Thuật Đen (Black Arts) của những năm 1960s and 1970s và phong trào Hip Hop mới khởi nguồn tại Bronx, thành phố New York vào những năm 1970, đã hầu như hoàn toàn vắng bóng. Nói một cách khác, tập sách này đã bỏ qua loại thơ diễn đọc phổ biến nhất vào thời gian nó được ấn hành.

Qua tác phẩm của nhạc sĩ chơi nhạc cho khán giả nhảy, nhà hoạt động, và  những nghệ sĩ Hip Hop, Afrika Bambatta nêu bật sự quan trọng mang tính xã hội ban đầu của những nghệ sĩ Hip Hop, như những thành viên băng nhóm hoàn lương, đã đem thanh thiếu niên đến nơi trình diễn nghệ thuật trong các khu phố nội thành. Nhưng những ca từ của ông (Afrika Bambatta) cũng nêu bật xu hướng quan trọng: sự trở lại của thể thơ bán chính thức và tầm quan trọng của vần. Những tổ chức  xã hội “Nước Đạo Hồi của Người Gốc Phi” (Afro-centric Nation of Islam) và “Nước của Nnhững Cha và Mẹ” (Nation of Gods and Earths (còn gọi tắt là 5% Nation) đã phổ biến trong những khu phố nội thành Hoa Kỳ, nhất là vào những năm 1950 và 1960 trở lại. Vì thế, chỉ là vấn đề thời gian trước khi thơ trình diễn phổ biến đính hôn với tiếng nói của Hồi Giáo, Hip Hop, và sự nhận thức xã hội. Tiêu biểu là những nghệ sĩ, những nhà hoạt động, và những nhà thơ như Ali Shaheed Mohammed, Q-Tip, Ice Cube, Phife Dawg, Busta Rhymes, Talib Kweli và Mos Def  (giờ là: Yasiin Bey), trong lập luận của họ, sự tái thức tỉnh của nhận thức xã hội là đặc tính của Phục Hưng Harlem và phong trào Nghệ Thuật Đen trong thể loại thơ mới, nói lên tiếng nói của sự thật với mọi con người trên thế giới. Trong khi sự kỳ thị của đạo Cơ Đốc Mỹ gốc Anh đã chủ động dẫm nát sự ảnh hưởng khởi nguồn từ phong tục Hồi giáo và Ả Rập, qua những thể thơ và hình thức thơ, suốt thế kỷ 20, cho đến thập niên 1990 và 2000 [sự kỳ thị] này mới không còn tồn tại.

Khế Iêm nhắc nhở chúng ta rằng tiếng Việt và tiếng Anh vốn là ngôn ngữ đơn âm, và mãi sau này tiếng Anh mới trở thành ngôn ngữ đa âm, khi ảnh hưởng từ vựng từ Hy Lạp và La Mã, được giới thiệu và chọn lọc qua những ngôn ngữ gốc La-tinh. Tương tự như vậy, bản chất vần mà thơ Tân hình thức tuân giữ, đã đến, không phải từ các ngôn ngữ gốc La Tinh [vốn] coi trọng thơ vần, mà từ tiếng Ả Rập, lần đầu tiên giới thiệu vần và thơ thể luật qua kinh Koran. Mos Def nhấn mạnh bản chất thơ thể luật và vần của kinh Koran  trong một cuộc phỏng vấn với học giả H. Samy Alim, và ở San Francisco, nghệ sĩ rap Bigga Figga cũng nhấn mạnh những điểm tương đồng giữa những cấu trúc ca từ của Hip Hop và "chủ ý sư phạm" của kinh Koran, trong đó vai trò của thơ thể luật và vần được sử dụng để "tiếp cận trái tim và khối óc nhân loại" (Samy Alim 2005: 264-268). Vì vậy, Hip Hop có phải làTân hình thức không? Là thơ Tự do? Hay đều không phải cả hai? Có phải những nhà thơ Tân hình thức tự xác định, nhận Hip Hop như người thừa kế thực sự của những truyền thống thơ Mỹ?

Các câu hỏi đặt ra ở trên phải thừa nhận là khiêu khích. Viết lách với một động lực để tìm ra sự thật thường là thế. Ý tưởng rõ ràng mời gọi phê bình. Ví dụ, Khế Iêm cho rằng [thơ] Tân Hình Thức là phương tiện "bác cầu" xu thế xuất bản của Việt Nam và Hoa Kỳ, trong khi Linh Đinh chỉ trích Khế Iêm quá chú trọng [một cách] "nguy hiểm" vào Tân hình thức. Tôi không cho là như thế, chúng ta phải hiểu rằng có một số lượng đáng kể các tác giả Việt-Mỹ, Hao Phan, Đinh Linh và nhiều người khác, hết lòng chấp nhận " Thế Hệ Beat" – như sự nhấn mạnh vào “Thơ tự do.” Tôi cũng lập luận rằng, trong nhiều cuộc thảo luận học thuật về thơ Tân hình thức như một thể loại thơ, đã có sự thiếu hiểu biết chung về tính phức tạp về lịch sử xã hội trong truyền thống thơ Mỹ, nhiều điều ấy đã được các học giả văn học Việt-Mỹ đưa ra ánh sáng. Tuy nhiên, đó không đúng với Tân hình thức vì cấu trúc vần của thơ Tân hình thức không chỉ mắc nợ từ nguồn thơ Ả Rập mà còn từ các nguồn khác. Chúng ta nhớ rằng có đến một phần ba của những người nô lệ châu Phi, trong đó có một số sheikh (lãnh tụ tôn giáo), những trí thức Hồi giáo đã được đưa sang Hoa Kỳ thông qua việc buôn bán nô lệ. Hai chất lượng thẩm mỹ chủ yếu  từ những bài hát bè (một người hát và toán đồng ca lập lại), và những bài thánh ca, được phổ biến trong văn hóa người Mỹ gốc Phi thế kỷ 19, là phương tiện dùng để tái tỉnh thức của Hồi Giáo tại Hoa Kỳ, bởi vì họ muốn bảo tồn chất lượng âm nhạc chính thức trong thơ. Mặc dù hầu hết các nô lệ người Mỹ gốc Phi đã buộc phải theo Cơ Đốc giáo và phải chọn những tên Thánh bằng tiếng Tây vào thế kỷ 19, những điều kiện lịch sử xã hội này là nền tảng cho sự tái thức tỉnh của người Hồi giáo Mỹ gốc Phi vào thế kỷ 20.

Mặc dù ảnh hưởng của văn hóa Hip Hop trên thi pháp đương đại Việt ít, nhưng vẫn có. Nhà thơ tự do Việt-Mỹ Bảo Phi được mời tham gia trong chương trình "Poetry Slam" vào những năm 2000, và chúng ta thấy [tác phẩm] Hip Hop đầu tiên được sản xuất bằng tiếng Việt và tại Việt Nam. Ở Wisconsin, các tác phẩm của cố thi sĩ Việt-Mỹ Johnny "Việt Nam" Nguyễn đang dần bị lãng quên một cách buồn bã chỉ trong một vài năm ngắn ngủi sau khi ông qua đời. Tuy nhiên, điều này không có nghĩa là khả năng của các thế hệ nối tiếp của các nhà thơ Mỹ, ở bất kỳ truyền thống nào, sẽ không có những hạt giống từ ảnh hưởng của các nhà thơ Việt-Mỹ, các nhà thơ Ả Rập, và các nhà thơ người Mỹ gốc Phi đã gieo trong họ.

Trần Vũ Liên Tâm dịch

Nguyên tác: Histories of American Poetry, the Harlem Renaissance and Hip Hop as New Formalism
By William B Noseworthy

Tài liệu tham khảo

– Alim, H Samy (2005). A New Research Agenda: Exploring the Transglobal Hip Hop Umma. Pp. 264-274 in eds. Miriam Cooke & Bruce B Lawrence.  Muslim Networks from Hajj to Hip Hop. Chapel Hill University Press: North Carolina.
– Curtis, Edward E. (2002). Islam in Black America: Identity, Liberation and Difference in African-American Islamic Thought. State University of New York Press: New York.
– Daulatzai, Sohail (2012). Black Star: Crescent Moon: The Muslim International and Black Freedom Beyond America. University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis, MN.
– GhaneaBassiri, Kambiz (2010). A History of Islam in America. Cambridge University Press: New York
Kreymborg, Alfred (1934). A History of American Poetry. Tudor Publishing Company: New York.
– Parini, Jay & Millier, Brett C. (1993) The Columbia History of American Poetry. Columbia University Press: New York.
– Stauffer, Donald Barlow (1974). A Short History of American Poetry. Dutton & Co.: New York.
– Zaturenska, Marya and Gregory, Horace (1969). A History of American Poetry: 1900-1940. Gordian Press: New York.